Common Hair Loss Terms 2017-02-02T20:13:46+00:00

Glossary of Hair Loss Terms

Be In The Know Become Familiar With The Lingo of Common Hair Loss Terms

We know that navigating the Hair Loss world is challenging enough.  Here are some commonly used words and or phrases that should help you better understand some of the lingo, and the terminology.

Click your mouse on a word or phrase to view a brief definition.

A subtype of alopecia, alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease which causes the body to develop antibodies which attack hair follicles. Resulting in sudden circular bald patches, the cause of alopecia areata is unknown.

Similiar to alopecia areata, alopecia totalis is an autoimmune disease that results in total hair loss at the scalp.

Similar to other forms of alopecia, alopecia universalis is an autoimmune disease that leads to a complete loss of hair, over the entire body.

Anagen effluvium is the loss of hair in the anagen phase. Also known as the growing phase, hair loss in the anagen phase is typically the result of chemotherapy or radiation.

The most common form of alopecia, androgenetic alopecia is a hereditary pattern of balding that causes hair follicles to become sensitive to the DHT hormone. Androgenetic alopecia can cause hair loss in both men and women.

Hair bonding is the process of bonding or fixing additional strands of hair to a patient’s existing hair.

The crown is the top portion, or highest point, on the scalp.

The donor area is the portion of the scalp where follicles are harvested, for transplant, during a surgical hair restoration procedure.

Donor dominance is the ability for donor hair follicles to continue to grow once transplanted in a recipient area.

Low level laser therapy are lasers that have been clinically proven to promote hair growth.

A pattern of baldness caused by hereditary markers, found in women, resulting in thinning or complete loss of hair. Female pattern baldness occurs behind the frontal portion of the hairline and in rare cases leads to complete baldness at the crown of the head.

A naturally grouped unit of one, two, or three hair follicles found in the skin. In rare cases four follicles can occur in a follicular unit though the average contains 2.4 hairs.

A Follicular Unit Extraction is a method of harvesting single follicular units, from a donor site, for transplantation during a hair transplant procedure.

A Follicular Unit Graft is a method of hair transplantation in which hair, in singular follicular units, is grafted to the recipient area. The FUG method is particularly popular as it yields exceptionally natural results.

Follicular unit transplants are the most common type of hair transplant practiced today. An FUT is completed by harvesting a strip of follicles from a patient’s naturally occurring hair. The strip is then dissected into individual follicular units and grafted to the recipient area.

A Follicular Unit Micrograft is a method of hair transplantation in which hair is taken from the donor site, typically in a long strip, and divided into single follicular units for grafting.

Hair plugs is a non-medial term which typically refers to an outdated hair transplant procedure that used large round grafts to restore a patient’s natural hair.

A hair follicle is a complete strand of hair, including the root. Hair follicles are extracted from a donor area and grafted to the recipient area during a hair transplant procedure.

A Hair graft is a hair follicle that has been extracted from the donor area and prepared for transplant into the recipient area of the scalp. Hair grafts can contain as little as a single hair follicle and up to 25 or more, depending on the hair grating technique.

Hair growth is the natural development of hair over time. Hair transplants restore hair growth in the recipient area of the scalp.

Hair loss is the thinning or balding of one’s hair. Hair loss can be hereditary and can also result from a wide variety of medical complications.

Hair regrowth is a term often used to describe medical hair restoration techniques.

Hair replacement is the process of restoring hair in balding areas of the scalp, eyelashes and eyebrows. The evolution of hair replacement technologies has resulting in a wide variety of restoration techniques designed to treat specific types of hair loss.

Hair restoration is the process of restoring hair in balding areas of the scalp, eyelashes, and eyebrows. There are many types of hair restoration techniques designed to treat specific types of hair loss.

A hair transplant is surgical technique which involves harvesting hair follicles from a donor area and grafting the extracted follicles to the recipient area, typically on the scalp.

The Ludwig Scale is used to classify female pattern baldness.

Male pattern baldness is a hereditary pattern of baldness caused by Dihydrotestosterone, found in men, resulting in thinning or complete loss of hair. Male pattern baldness can start anytime after puberty and typically begins with hairline recession and thinning at the crown of the head. The sides and back of the scalp are rarely affected by male pattern baldness.

A Micrograft is a hair transplant containing one or two hairs, harvested from the donor site with a micropunch or sliced from a round graft. Micrografts are generally implanted into the scalp through incisions made with a microneedle or punch.

A Minigraft is a hair transplant that is either classified as a small minigraft or a large minigraft. Small minigrafts contain three or four hairs while large minigraft contain five to six hairs.

A Multi-Unit Graft contains two to six follicular units. A Multi-Unit Graft or a “MUG” is a term commonly used in place of the term “Minigraft.”

The Norwood Scale is used to classify male pattern baldness.

The recipient area is the region in which harvested hair follicles are placed, typically on the crown of the head.

Round grafts were the very first type of hair graft to be used in hair transplants. Round grafts are harvested in many different sizes and can be dissected into smaller grafts before transplantation.

Scalp reduction, also known as “alopecia reduction,” is a procedure that removes a portion of the balding scalp, bringing the hairline closer to the front of the scalp. Scalp reduction is most often preformed on those with baldness at the crown.

A slit graft is a type of follicular graft that is inserted into a small slit cut into the scalp during a hair transplantation.

The temples or temporal area is located in the low, outer corners of the forehead. This is generally the area in which male pattern baldness begins, resulting in a receding hairline.

The vertex area is the area at the back or top portion of the scalp. Also known as the crown, the vertex is often the first area in which male pattern baldness is evident.